Usps.tuktion.top Scam: Beware Of This Fake Usps Delivery Text!

Beware of the USPS Scam text message that contains a link to Usps.tuktion.top. It’s a phishing scam. Usps.tuktion.top is a fake USPS website that has nothing to do with United States Postal Service.

The Usps.tuktion.top Scam Text claims you’ve a package that couldn’t be delivered due to incomplete postal address. However, it’s just a bait to make recipients visit the malicious site Usps.tuktion.top’.

How does the Usps.tuktion.top Scam work?

The Usps.tuktion.top scam is a phishing scam text message that tells recipients to visit Usps.tuktion.top to solve the issue of package delivery failure.

The aim of this scam is to get your personal and financial information and your credit card information when you visit the site. Your personal information includes; your name, address, telephone number, and email address. While your credit card information entails your credit card number, cardholder’s name, expiration date, signature, CVC code.

By providing this information, you’ve exposed yourself to identity theft, credit card fraud, and other types of cybercrime.

You could also expose your mobile device viruses, spywares, malwares, when you click on the link. This is because the website isn’t an official USPS website, and likely contains spywares, malwares and viruses which are harmful to devices and can hack and destroy your mobile devices.

How to find out if a USPS text message is a scam

Legit USPS texts will always include your tracking number, which you can double-check on their official website ‘Usps.tuktion.top’.

Here’s how you can identify a USPS scam text:

  • No tracking number, or a fake one that doesn’t exist on the official USPS website
  • A sense of urgency to share personal info, like your address
  • Spelling, grammar, or other language mistakes
  • Links to website addresses that are spelled slightly differently from official USPS sites
  • Demands for extra re-delivery fees

What To Do If You Received The Usps.tuktion.top Scam Text

If you’ve received the Usps.tuktion.top text message, these are the steps you should take to protect yourself and data.

Do Not Click On The Link

Don’t attempt to click on the link no matter how similar it looks to ‘USPS.com’ Clicking links inside a USPS scam text message would either direct you to a fake USPS website or install malware into your device.

Report The Scam Text

Contact USPS Support or the company the scam text is impersonating to report the scam immediately. This can help them warn other customers and stop future scams.

Delete The message

Deleting the scam text message will prevent you from mistakenly replying to it.

Block The Sender’s Number or Email

The final step you should take is blocking the telephone number or email address that sent the scam text message. You can do this by adding the number or email address in your phone’s spam list.

What To Do If You’ve Already Fallen for the Usps.tuktion.top Scam Phishing Text

You should take the following steps if you’ve already provided your information on Usps.tuktion.top;

Inform Your Credit Card Company

If you provided your credit card details on this scam site, the first step you should take is calling your credit card company. They need to know that your card details have been compromised so as to closely monitor and prevent any unauthorized charges.

Place a Credit Freeze or Fraud Alert

Fraud alert is sort of like a two-factor authentication process for accessing your credit, whereas a credit freeze blocks anyone from accessing your credit — until you remove it. The credit freeze is the best option for you, if you know you wouldn’t be using the credit card anytime soon.

Scan Your Device with a Malware Checker Tool

There’s a likelihood that your device has been infested by malware or spyware after visiting usps-trackship.com. Scanning your device with a malware removal tool will detect and remove any viruses, spyware, or other malicious programs. See best malware device tools here

Conclusion

The Usps.tuktion.top text message is not from USPS (United States Postal Service) but a phishing text sent by scammers. This scam uses social engineering tactics to try to trick you into clicking on the scam link in order to get your personal and credit card details. Don’t fall for it!

See similar phishing scam; SharpUSPS scam text, Wal Tracking Scam, Delware BPO Scam, Publix 90TH Anniversary, etc.

Wendy

Wendy is an Entry-Level Security Analyst who's passionate about cybersecurity and dedicated to protecting people and organizations from emerging threats. She has a strong knowledge of cybercrimes, network security, vulnerability management, and incident response.

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