Watt Rescue Review [2021] Read Before You Buy!

Thinking of buying Watt Rescue energy saver? Read this 2021 updated review before you buy!

With online scams springing up every day, we have taken the responsibility of reviewing products, stores, websites e.t.c in order to save you from making wrong decisions.

Our Review of this product serves as an eyeopener. We hope it meets you well, and on time.

Watt Rescue Energy Power Saver- Is It Worth It?

One of the reasons why this AC is the rave of the internet is because it allegedly reduces 90% of your electricity bill. Furthermore, the Watt Rescue Energy saver is been sold for 50% discount. You also get to pay lower when you buy more.

However, when you dig beneath all the so called positive reviews online, you’d see that there are no genuine customer reviews of this product. The seemingly positive reviews were written by affiliate marketers who don’t care if the product actually works or not. What they are after, is their commission at the end of the day.

It is true that this website seems legit, however what you should be worried about is if this device will actually save you energy, indeed?

Suspicious Things About Watt Rescue Power Saver!

Though there are lots of positive reviews about this power saving device, they are not telling you the exact truth about the product. Below are reasons why you shouldn’t think of buying any power saving device-

Saves Little or No Energy

When you unbox the device, you would see it is a capacitor placed across the power line. This actually might do a little bit of power factor correction, but you are not billed for reactive power at home. So it saves you nothing in money.

Furthermore, the gadget capacitor draws about 100 mA of capacitive (leading) current from the line. If you happen to have a device which draws about 100 mA of inductive (lagging) current component, this capacitor will cancel that. It won’t draw more when you need more. It won’t stop drawing current when you don’t need any correction.

It probably has *just enough* effect that the statements in the ads are not complete lies, but the device is still completely useless in general.

Might Cause Fire Hazard

When I went through the video on the official website, the one thing I couldn’t tell from the video, and the narrator didn’t mention: Is the capacitor inside the Watt Rescue  actually rated for connection across the AC line? Is it a fire hazard if there is a lightning strike nearby? Capacitors connected directly to the AC line are supposed to have an “X” rating for safety, and because this capacitor is potted in epoxy, I can’t tell if it if actually safe or not.

Fake Customer Reviews

The positive reviews online, both that of Youtube and Blogs, are all fake. This is because they were almost the same contents, copy and pasted with slight difference.

Also, We have seen this kinds of reviews and the exact device many times, and of a truth they are all the same. They don’t work. You can check this review here to see for yourself.

Does Watt Rescue Energy Saver Really Work?

The answer to the question is No. In fact, BBC has also addressed the issue on this article here. The truth is that energy saving devices like Watt Rescue  are unsafe and could cause a fire or electrocution.

There are a bunch of these devices with different names, but they all seem to have the same case.  They don’t save any energy.

So what are the better ways to save energy and reduce electricity bills? check this review here to find out efficient ways to save energy in 2021.

UPDATE- In the one year this review was published, there have been opposing views on if this energy saver really works. We ask that you do due diligence when buying this product.

One comment

  1. Some elderly householders are being targeted by people offering to sell them bogus “energy saving” devices that are dangerous.
    Trading standards officers say they have received more than 200 complaints about phone calls from the scammers.
    The callers claim to be energy suppliers, or their partners, and offer a plug-in gadget that supposedly cuts electricity use by 40%.
    The officials say they are unsafe and could cause a fire or electrocution.
    Ron Gainsford, chief executive of the Trading Standards Institute, said criminals were using high energy prices as a pretext for selling dangerous devices, mainly to elderly householders.
    “A safety recall has been issued for the items traced so far,” he said.

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